Durchsuchen nach
Kategorie: phalaenopsis

Orchid Update

Orchid Update

The blooming goes on:
Photobucket
But it threw the heart-leaf…am now wondering if those blossoms will be its last?

This heart-leaf is just too adorable – without flash it looks even more red to the eye:
Photobucket

Various orchid news

Various orchid news

The first blossom of my white miniature orchid is about to open anytime soon, now, am so excited about it. The first blossoms that any plant has “made” here, the others they already had when I bought them.
Photobucket

My spotted Phalaenopsis is slowly giving up the awesome blossoms now, but it also makes a new leaf, giving me a little scare at first, because I had expected something green, not dark-red. *g*
Photobucket

Nopsi and the rescue from the flowershop have been potted in Sphagnum moss now, in hopes to improve the growth of their roots. The little yellow one has already improved her floppy leaves in the night it stood in the moss now, that’s really cool!
Photobucket

Photobucket
I bought the moss at the zoo-shop, happy that I remembered that you can also use it for animals living in terrarium surroundings. Like that, I had not to mailorder it.

And the most amazing thing- on Saturday I looked at my Dendrobium again, which I had half forgotten in its little indoor greenhouse. I was most amazed at what I saw, not only is it still stubbornly clinging to life- no it also attempts some little (malformed) flowerstalk! And down on those stems, the green spots are hopefully new roots showing. Apparently as long as the roots are halfway ok, an orchid will survive even worst case scenarios!
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

>Orchideen Rehbein (bilangual)

>Orchideen Rehbein (bilangual)

>Am Samstag war ich bei Orchideen Rehbein in Curslack – und bin immer noch völlig begeistert.
Entgegen meinen Befürchtungen ist es auch mit dem Bus gut zu erreichen, man darf nur vor lauter gucken nicht die Zeit vergessen um dann auch die Rückfahrt planen zu können, der Bus fährt nämlich nur einmal pro Stunde.

Dann mal hier die Begeisterung in Kurzform:
Wenn man ankommt, dann betritt man sofort ein Blütenmeer, denn der erste Raum mit sehr angenehmer indirekter Beleuchtung ist voll mit den gerade blühenden Pflanzen, die zum Verkauf stehen. Dazwischen standen auch ein paar Jungpflanzen ohne Blüte und welche, die bereits einen Blütentrieb in Arbeit hatten. Die große Mehrzahl bildeten die Phalaenopsis Orchideen, aber mein noch recht ungeschultes Auge hat auch ein paar wunderschöne Vandeen entdeckt, von denen eine in Mitternachtsblau sofort Begehrlichkeiten geweckt hat (eine tolle Rote war auch toll), aber erstmal will ich mal Erfahrungen sammeln. Sicher standen dort vorn auch noch andere Arten, aber wie gesagt, ich bin da kein Experte.

Ich wurde sofort von den Rehbeins freundlich begrüßt und hätte in aller Ruhe schauen können, aber da ich Fragen hatte, konnte ich diese gleich bei Frau Rehbein loswerden und zwischendurch immer noch in Ruhe schauen. Ich durfte auch in den Gewächshausteil, in dem die gerade nicht blühenden Pflanzen und noch viele mir unbekannte Arten standen. Eine faszinierende grüne Welt in der es von winzigen Pflanzen die in lebendem Moos saßen, über aufgebundende, tropisch wirkende Pflanzen zu Begleitpflanzen wie Bromelien so viel zusehen gab. So für den Anfang war es fast etwas viel, ich habe nur noch gestaunt.

Dann ging ich zurück zu den blühenden Pflanzen und machte nochmals eine Runde, um mir alle nochmal zu betrachten. Schon auf der ersten Runde hatte ich ein paar Favoriten und durfte mir diese aus der Masse and Blüten herausnehmen und auf einen leeren Tisch stellen, um sie in Ruhe zu betrachten. Da hat man dann erstmal gemerkt wie sehr die ganzen vielen Blüten das Auge ablenken können.

Ich wollte ja unbedingt ein Pflanze mit Gelb oder echtem Rot und deshalb sprang mir dieser Topf mit zwei kräftigen Pflanzen sofort ins Auge – die Blühten haben ein wunderbares zartes Gelb, das sich auf Fotos nur schwer korrekt wiedergeben lässt:
Photobucket
Die musste also auf alle Fälle unbedingt mit! Hier noch ein Blütenbild:
Photobucket

Dann hatte ich auf vielen, vielen Bildern im Internet die Phalaenopsis Mini Mark bestaunt, denn sie hat kleine grazile Blüten und viele leuchtende Sprenkel. Ich war mehr als begeistert als ich hier auch welche fand und sogar zwischen zwei Töpfen wählen konnte. Auch hier sind zwei kräftige Pflanzen zusammen im Topf:
Photobucket

Blütenbild:
Photobucket

Und während ich noch so glücklich meine zwei Kandidaten betrachtet, zeigte mir Frau Rehbein noch etwas Besonderes. Eine Naturform der Phalaenopsis, die nach Zitrone riecht wenn sie blüht. Ich fand den Geruch und auch die eher ursprüngliche Form der Pflanze mit kurzem Blütentrieb und den beinahe glasiert aussehenden Blüten faszinierend. Nun hatte ich aber schon überall im Internet gelesen was für einen Aufwand die Haltung von Naturformen machen kann. Frau Rehbein konnte meine Zweifel hier aber sehr nachdrücklich zerstreuen und somit bin ich nun auch glückliche Besitzerin einer Phalaenopsis bellina.
Photobucket
Ich habe eine Pflanze mit Knospe gekauft, da mir das für den Heimtransport sicherer erschien als eine offene Blüte. Außerdem ist das Warten nun spannend. *g*
Photobucket

English Version:
Last Saturday, I visited Orchideen Rehbein here in Hamburg Curslack. And I really can’t say how delighting it was! So much to see and such a kind welcome by the Rehbeins. All my questions were answered and I learned a lot from Frau Rehbein’s explanations to all the plants that caught my eye. But here now a long story shortened:
Arriving there, you stepped right into a large airy room with indirect light where all the currently blooming sales orchids awaited. It really got almost a bit much and the first impulse is kinda to ask if one could live there, LOL!! Pocket- Elysium.

A sheep-wire “wall” seperated the room from a real greenhouse part where the non-blossoming orchids filled row upon row. Wiregrills were randomly set up between the big tables. On those wires hung pieces of bark with orchids tied to them. Some looked a lot like my tillandsia. There were some super mini-species that live in swamplands and grew in very moist pots with living moss. This moss was blooming very adorably, very tiny little mossflowers!
A lot of different species were to be seen, all of the warm to warmly-temparate kind of orchids.

After a while I returned to the room with the blooming plants. On the first round in that room, some had already caught my eye and I ogled them now closely again. They allowed me to fish out my favourites and put them onto an empty table to get an undistracted full view of them.

So there I was with a lovely soft, soft yellow hybrid(haaard to photograph) and a Phalaenopsis “Mini Mark”- a sort with small flowers which I had often admired on the web already.

I was already sure that I could never decide between those two, when Frau Rehbein gave me a little tour to a corner which I had left out in the salesroom- there the natural forms of orchids lived.
I had only briefly looked at them, because all over the internet you always hear how difficult they are, how much extra stuff you need and so on.

She managed to dissipate my doubts most reasonably, though, and so I fell for a Phalaenopsis bellina, because they smell of lemons when they bloom, most awesome!
They had some in bloom to test-snuffle, but I picked one with an almost finished blossom that will open here now, hopefully, because I was afraid to transport something so delicate.

>Free Nopsi!

>Free Nopsi!

>Um, well, kinda, LOL!!
I know that you have to be patient with recovering plants, but I had such a bad feeling about my sick orchid that I removed her from the substrate once more. And rightly so, the rot was climbing up still. Sooo… this time I did cut upwards into the stem from below radically so that I saw only healthy green, then treated with cinnamon, removed the floppiest leaf and decided to change strategy.
At least for a while there will be no substrate, just air. Hoping to get the roots dry and clean like this. Last chance. *crosses fingers*
Photobucket
Come on, “Nopsi”, we cheer you on!

>More orchid pictures

>More orchid pictures

>… I am afraid you’ll have to live with lots of those in the future, I really fell for those beautiful plants. ^-^
I tried to make a series of an opening blossom on my large Phalaenopsis, but it went faster than I thought and when I came home that day, it was already done. So here are only a few stages. I am now hoping for one of them opening on a weekend.*g*
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

I have read up lots of knowledge on the web already, but I prefer it concentrated in a book if such a thing is available. In case of orchids, there are lots available. I got one that covers all the basics and has helpful tips if a plant is sick or has unbidden creepy-crawly visitors. It also has lots of beautiful pictures:
Photobucket

Of the newest orchid I have posted a detail picture of a flower, but not yet of the other two, so let me change this:
The Dendrobium (still looking for exact name):
Photobucket

And the small Phalaenopsis hybrid:
Photobucket

>Taking a shower at Billwerder Moorfleet…

>Taking a shower at Billwerder Moorfleet…

>…getting really really rained on. But it looks like I can get a sprinkled orchid afterall. There are nicely sprinkled phalaenopsis, too! (These are kinda “easy”)
It is a sprinkled “phalaenopsis mashimo”
Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
No way I could resist that one! (And look, it matches the lamp, LOL!!)

So now I have three pretty orchids and am happy and hope they are, too. *g* As I have read a lot about Bonsai recently, I came to the conclusion that I will never have one again, since even those called “indoors” are kept in constant compromise, but not in ideal surroundings. I would feel bad if I killed another of those delicate little trees. That is why I settle for the orchids instead, which have a serious chance to feel good in the surroundings that I can offer.